Anti-Poaching and Wildlife Crime Investigation for Assam

Freeland India, together with Aaranyak, conducted an intensive six day anti-poaching and wildlife crime investigation training for 21 forest personnel in Kaziranga National Park, Assam, in March 2016.

The trainees, from Kaziranga National Park, Manas Tiger Reserve, Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary and Kokrajhar, Nagaon, Mangaldai and Digboi Wildlife Divisions, spent a week working their way through intense, realistic scenarios to prepare them for their demanding work.

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Fieldcraft lessons

Tasked with defending some of the last strongholds of the endangered Indian Rhinoceros, the trainees were put through a demanding schedule that included modules on: leadership, esprit-de-corps, fieldcraft, patrol drills, information gathering, crime scene processing, surveillance, planned raids, case preparation and facing cross examination.

Practicing crime scene processing

Practicing crime scene processing

Shri Suvasish Das, DFO of Eastern Assam Wildlife Division, handed out certificates to trainees who completed the course.

“The enforcement response needs to be as organised and focused as that of criminals who target the animals”, says Onkuri Majumdar, Managing Director of  Freeland India. “Otherwise, we run the risk of a few criminal syndicates undoing years of field conservation efforts.”

Gathering evidence at a mock crime scene

Gathering evidence at a mock crime scene

The course was conducted under Freeland India’s flagship PROTECT- DETECT training programme. While the PROTECT anti-poaching training equips trainees to safely and effectively carry out patrolling tasks in forests, the DETECT wildlife crime investigation training enables officers to comprehensively investigate and prosecute wildlife crimes. Aaranyak‘s specialists in Assam wildlife law and forensics added their knowledge to the resource team.

Facing cross-examination

Facing cross-examination

The training was conducted by Freeland India and Aaranyak at the Kohora Centenary Convention Centre, Kaziranga National Park, with support from the Assam Forest Department and the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

For more information contact: info@freelandindia.org